Are you paying your casual staff the right rates?

Did you know that from January 2018, if you have casual and part-time employees, they can actually be earning overtime rates once they work over 38 hours in the week? Or even if your employee only needs to work for one hour on a particular day, you may be liable to pay them for a minimum amount of hours?

Another change this year, if your casual employee has been employed by you for over 12 months continuously, then they are entitled to change their terms with you to become a permanent employee, therefore be earning pro rata holidays and sick leave.

Some awards have already covered these provisions, and you may have already got this covered. But if they hadn’t specified these details up until now, the Fair Work Commission have revised many awards so these rates and provisions may now effect you as of the first full pay in January 2018.

It really pays to stay on top of these changes and ensure that you are familiar with the awards covering your staff.

I’ve included an extract from the Institute of Certified Bookkeepers (Newsletter Jan 2018) as to what awards have specified these changes.

Name of Award Overtime Paid Minimum Hours Condition Determining Overtime (OT)
Fast Food Industry Yes No Employee works:

  • More than 38 hr per week; or
  • Average 38 hr per week over roster period
  • More than 11 hrs on any day the excess is overtime
General Retails Industry Yes No Employee works:

  • More than 38 hrs per week; or
  • Average 38 hrs per week over a roster cycle
  • More than 9 hrs per day provided that one day per week casual worker may work 11 hours without attracting penalty rates
  • Outside the span of ordinary working hours
  • Penalty rates applied to the ord. hrly rate of pay, with the casual loading also to be applied to the ordinary rate of pay. Rates are not cumulative upon casual hrly rate of pay
Hair and Beauty Industry Yes No Employee works:

  • More than 38 hrs per week; or
  • Average 38 hrs over a roster cycle; or
  • More than 10.5 hrs on any day excess is overtime
Hospitality Industry (General) Yes No Employee works:

  • More than 38 hrs per week; or
  • Average 38 hours per week over a roster cycle; or
  • More than 12 hours on any day, excess is overtime
Passenger Vehicle Transportation No Yes School bus drivers transporting students to and from school can be rostered for one or two shifts per day. Each shift is minimum 2 hrs
Pastoral No Yes Minimum hours for dairy operators that are 18 years or younger, which are full-time secondary school students, is 2 hrs
Registered and Licenced Clubs Yes No Employee works:

  • More than 38 hrs per week; or
  • Average 38 hours per week over roster cycle; or
  • More than 12 hrs on any day is excess is overtime
  • May be entitled to meal allowance when working overtime.
Restaurant Industry Yes No Employee works:

  • more than 38 hr per week; or
  • Average 38 hr per week over roster period
  • More than 12 hrs or per shift on any day the excess is overtime
Wine Industry No Yes An employee working throughout pruning or harvesting work during unexpected wet weather has the minimum hours reduced from 4 to 2.

 

 

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